Calathea Ornata (Pinstripe Plant)

by | May 16, 2022

Calathea Ornata

The Calathea Ornata, more commonly known as the pinstripe plant, is a beautiful houseplant that is native to South America. This plant was introduced to Europe and North America in the 19th century, where it quickly became a popular houseplant. The Calathea Ornata gets its name from the pinstripe patterns that adorn its leaves. These eye-catching leaves are what make this plant so popular among indoor plant enthusiasts. This plant prefers warm climates and high humidity levels.

calathea ornata pinstripe plant

Calathea Ornata Care Tips

Despite its exotic appearance, the Calathea Ornata is relatively easy to care for. Here are a few tips on how to care for your plant:

  • Place your plant in an area of your home that receives indirect sunlight. Too much direct sunlight will cause the leaves to fade.
  • Water regularly, but make sure the soil is allowed to dry out in between watering. Overwatering can lead to root rot.
  • This plant enjoys high humidity levels. If the air in your home is too dry, consider placing your plant on a pebble tray or using a humidifier.
  • Fertilize your Calathea Ornata every other month with a balanced houseplant fertilizer.

Water

Water your Calathea regularly, but make sure the soil is allowed to dry out in between watering. Overwatering can lead to root rot. The best way to water your plant is to use lukewarm water and water from the bottom up. Allow the water to drain and never leave your plant sitting in water. You can also water your plant from the top down, but be sure to use distilled water or rainwater to avoid any potential mineral build-up on the leaves. Calatheas are known for being high-maintenance plants!

Light

The Calathea Ornata needs indirect light to maintain its vibrant colors. Too much direct sunlight will cause the leaves to fade and/or burn. The amount of light needed per day is about 6-8 hours per day. You should place your plant near an east-facing window for best results. if you do not have access to natural light, you can also grow your plant under grow lights. Be careful to not leave your plant under grow lights for more than 12 hours per day as this can lead to leggy growth.

Humidity

Your Calathea will enjoy high humidity levels. If the air in your home is too dry, consider placing your plant on a pebble tray or using a humidifier. You can also mist it with lukewarm water every few days to increase the humidity. The humidity level for a Calathea should be around 60-70%.

Feeding

Fertilize your Calathea Ornata every other month with a balanced houseplant fertilizer. You can also use a slow-release fertilizer at the beginning of the growing season. The beginning of the growing season is typically around March or April. Be sure to follow the directions on the fertilizer package as too much fertilizer can burn the roots of your plant.

Temperature

The Calathea Ornata is best kept in a home with temperatures between 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit. These plants do not like extreme cold or heat and will start to die off if the temperature gets too high or low. You can keep a digital thermometer near your plants to make sure the temperature stays consistent.

Propagating

You can propagate your Calathea Ornata by dividing the rootball or by taking stem cuttings. Dividing the rootball is the easiest method and can be done every few years. To divide the rootball, simply remove your plant from its pot and carefully divide the roots into two or three sections. Be sure to use a sharp knife or shears to avoid damaging the roots. You can then replant each section in its pot filled with fresh potting soil.

To take stem cuttings, simply cut a 4-6 inch section of stem from your plant using a sharp knife or shears. Remove the bottom leaves from the stem cutting and dip the end in rooting hormone. Place the stem cutting in a pot filled with fresh potting mix and water well. Keep the soil moist and provide bright, indirect light. Your stem cutting should root within 4-6 weeks.

Repotting

You will need to repot your Calathea Ornata every 1-2 years or if it seems to be outgrowing its current pot. Be sure to use a pot that is only slightly larger than the previous pot as these plants do not like being rootbound. When repotting, be sure to use fresh potting soil and water well. Allow the soil to dry out somewhat in between watering.

Toxicity

The Calathea Ornata is not poisonous to humans or animals. However, the leaves of this plant can cause skin irritation. If you come into contact with the leaves, wash the area with soap and water. Seek medical attention if the irritation persists.

Common Problems

One of the most common problems with Calathea Ornata is browning or yellowing leaves. This can be caused by several factors, including insufficient humidity, too much direct sunlight, or improper watering. If you notice your plant’s leaves beginning to turn brown or yellow, take a closer look at your plant’s care routine and make adjustments as needed.

Other common problems include mealybugs, spider mites, and leaf spot disease. Mealybugs and spider mites are both sap-sucking pests that can cause damage to your plant. Mealybugs can be controlled with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol, while spider mites can be controlled with a strong spray of water. Leaf spot disease is caused by a fungus and can be controlled with a fungicide.

FAQ

Is a Calathea Ornata easy to care for?

Yes, it is a relatively easy plant to care for. These plants are somewhat tolerant of neglect and can tolerate low light conditions, although they prefer bright, indirect light. These plants also prefer high humidity levels, so be sure to mist your plant regularly or use a humidifier if the air in your home is dry.

Why are the leaves of my Calathea Ornata turning brown or yellow?

There are some reasons why the leaves of your plant might be turning brown or yellow. This can be caused by insufficient humidity, too much direct sunlight, or improper watering. If you notice your plant’s leaves beginning to turn brown or yellow, take a closer look at your plant’s care routine and make adjustments as needed.

What are the most common problems with Calathea Ornata?

The most common problems are browning or yellowing leaves, mealybugs, spider mites, and leaf spot disease.

Is Calathea Ornata poisonous?

No, the Calathea Ornata is not poisonous to humans or animals. However, the leaves of this plant can cause skin irritation. If you come into contact with the leaves, wash the area with soap and water. Seek medical attention if the irritation persists.

Is a Calathea Ornata a rare plant?

No, the Calathea Ornata is not a rare plant. These plants are widely available and can be found at most garden centers or online retailers.

I think my Calathea Ornata is dying, what should I do?

If you think your Calathea is dying, the first thing you should do is take a closer look at your plant’s care routine. Make sure you are providing high humidity, bright indirect light, and consistent temperatures between 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit. If you have recently fertilized your plant, you may be fertilizing too often. You should be fertilized every other month. You should also check for pests, such as mealybugs, spider mites, or leaf spot disease. If you find pests on your plant, take steps to control them according to the instructions provided in this care guide. Finally, if your plant is rootbound, it may need to be repotted.

Final Words

The Calathea Ornata is a beautiful houseplant that is relatively easy to care for. These plants prefer high humidity, bright indirect light, and consistent temperatures between 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit. The most common problems are browning or yellowing leaves, mealybugs, spider mites, and leaf spot disease. With proper care, your Calathea Ornata will thrive and bring beauty to your home for years to come. However, if you neglect your plant, it may start to show signs of stress, such as browning or yellowing leaves. So be sure to give your plant the love and attention it needs and it will reward you with its beautiful foliage.

Shelbi Clifford

Shelbi Clifford

Hi, I'm Shelbi! I am the founder of Houseplant Advisor - a blog for all things houseplants. Whether you are looking to add some green to your home or want to learn about how plants can help improve air quality in your space, Houseplant Advisor is here with the answers. Do you have any questions? Feel free to reach out and ask me anything!

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

About Houseplant Advisor

Our aim? Simple. Cut through the jargon and help you make the right decisions for your indoor plants and leafy green friends. Follow us for more!

Join Our Community

Houseplant Advisor is reader-supported. We may earn a commission through products purchased using links on this page.

Explore Other Houseplants

Philodendron Pink Princess (Philodendron erubescens)

Philodendron Pink Princess (Philodendron erubescens)

The exquisite and highly coveted pink princess philodendron is on the top of many plant enthusiasts' wish lists, and for good reason. Among plants, the pink princess is one-of-a-kind. It has dark green, heart-shaped leaves with bubblegum pink streaks. It's easy to...

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) is a popular houseplant that looks nice and has a lot of other uses as well. People call them medicinal plants because they can help heal wounds, calm irritation, soothe sunburns, and more. Just rip off a leaf and put the gel on red skin...

Fiddle Leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata)

Fiddle Leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata)

The Fiddle Leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata) is a well-known houseplant that is known for its large, glossy leaves. Native to western Africa, the fiddle leaf fig is a member of the Moraceae family, which also includes plants such as the rubber tree and the mulberry. The fiddle...

Pin It on Pinterest