Pilea Peperomioides (Chinese Money Plant)

by | Feb 9, 2022

Chinese Money Plant
Plants 58

About the Pilea Peperomioides (Chinese Money Plant)

The Pilea Peperomioides (Chinese money plant) is a popular indoor plant for people who want an easy-to-care-for, low maintenance houseplant. These plants are also known as Chinese Money Plant due to the fact that they resemble coins in their natural form. Although this common name can be attributed to the similarity of leaves and stems with paper currency, there is another theory behind the origin of its name. It’s believed that in ancient China when someone received a gift from someone else it was considered polite not to touch it with your hands so you would use two sticks or chopsticks instead; one stick would hold up the gift while the other poked holes into it. The Pilea or Chinese money plant were often used because they grew in bunches and had a hole in the center.

This small plant is quite easy to care for, making it one of the more popular houseplants among novice gardeners or householders.

How to care for the Pilea

When taking care of a Pilea it is important to remember that they need a lot of indirect light and moderate warmth. During the fall and winter, Pilea’s may stop growing altogether but will show new growth in the spring so don’t get discouraged if it looks like nothing is happening. If you have a Pilea plant indoors you should keep it at room temperature throughout the year. While these plants are tolerant of dry air, they are not drought resistant so it is important to water them when the soil has dried out. Pilea is drawn to moist soil but does not like constantly wet roots or standing water. Thick piles of slightly yellow leaves usually indicate that the plant needs more light, while long and thin leaves may be due to too little water. If the leaves are sparse and pale it may mean that there is too much light or possibly a toxic buildup of salts.

Although the Pilea (Chinese money plant) only requires water every couple weeks to keep its leaves healthy, one of the common problems with these plants is over-watering. If you’re not familiar with caring for houseplants, it’s easy to overwater; this can lead to root rot and kill your plant. If you notice the leaves beginning to turn yellow at the bottom, this is a sign of overwatering – check to make sure your plant isn’t sitting in water or has excess moisture around its base.

Light

The Pilea (Chinese money plant) needs a lot of indirect light and moderate warmth to thrive. The best place to keep a Pilea is next to a window that gets light, but not direct sunlight. Pilea may stop growing altogether during the winter and grow new leaves in the spring, so don’t get discouraged if you don’t see growth for a couple months.

Water

The best way to water a Pilea is to wait until the soil has dried out and then give it a good drink. You shouldn’t water your Pilea plant constantly, as this can lead to root rot. Instead, water it when the soil has dried out.

Humidity

The Pilea (Chinese money plant) is not affected by dry air; however, it does like plenty of humidity. It thrives in humid conditions, so misting it with water or putting it on a water-filled tray can help keep the humidity high.

Feeding

In order to get the most from your Pilea it should be fed regularly. Fertilizing a Pilea once a month will keep it healthy and growing strong.

Temperature

Pilea (Chinese money plant) does best in room temperature throughout the year, with no cold drafts. It can also tolerate warmer temperatures, but never let it get hotter than 90°F.

Repotting

If you want your Pilea to produce new leaves and stems, it’s important to let the roots have some room. You can move your plant into a larger pot or repot it every spring. To repot your Pilea, place it in a container with fast-draining soil.

Propagating

Pilea can be propagated by dividing its root ball, cutting off a stem and potting it, or putting the stem in water to grow new plants. If you divide your Pilea’s roots, make sure to handle them carefully so they don’t break—Pilea’s have very brittle roots.

Toxicity

Pilea (Chinese money plant) is non-toxic.

Common Problems

Pilea (Chinese money plant) has a few common problems that can affect its growth. Possible problems include root rot, aphids, and scale insects.

FAQ

How often should I water a Pilea?

The best way to tell if a Pilea needs water is by the weight of the pot. When it’s time for a drink, you’ll want to put your Pilea on a saucer and give it about an inch of water. This shouldn’t need to be done more than once every two weeks.

What kind of soil does a Pilea need?

A Pilea likes fast-draining soil that is on the looser side of medium, so it’s good to mix some sand into your potting mix before planting your Pilea. If you want new leaves and stems, it’s important to let the roots have some room. You can move your plant into a larger pot or repot it every spring.

Can I fertilize my Pilea?

A Pilea needs to be fed regularly in order to get the most from its growth, so it’s important to fertilize once a month with a dilute fertilizer (like fish emulsion). If you want your Pilea to produce new leaves and stems, it’s important to let the roots have some room. You can move your plant into a larger pot or repot it every spring.

What kind of light does a Pilea need?

The Pilea (Chinese money plant) needs a lot of indirect light and moderate warmth to thrive. The best place to keep a Pilea is next to a window that gets light, but not direct sunlight. Pilea may stop growing altogether during the winter and grow new leaves in the spring, so don’t get discouraged if you don’t see growth for a couple months.

What are some fun facts about Pilea?

Pilea (Chinese money plant) is native to the Yunnan province in China, where it is known as pinyin. The meaning of this word in Chinese (番石榴) means “foreign rock lemon,” which refers to how it was introduced into China from Africa.

Conclusion

The Pilea Peperomioides (Chinese money plant) is a small, leafy houseplant that can grow up to 10 inches tall and wide. It’s easy to care for and has bright green leaves with dark markings and white flowers. This article should have given you some great advice on how to care for your own Pilea, as well as facts about this easy-to-maintain houseplant.

Shelbi Clifford

Shelbi Clifford

About The Author

Hi, I'm Shelbi! I am the founder of Houseplant Advisor - a blog for all things houseplants. Whether you are looking to add some green to your home or want to learn about how plants can help improve air quality in your space, Houseplant Advisor is here with the answers. Do you have any questions? Feel free to reach out and ask me anything!

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